Murder on the Orient Express Review

Just after midnight, a snowdrift stops the Orient Express in its tracks. The luxurious train is surprisingly full for the time of the year, but by the morning it is one passenger fewer. An American tycoon lies dead in his compartment, stabbed a dozen times, his door locked from the inside. Isolated and with a killer in their midst, detective Hercule Poirot must identify the murderer—in case he or she decides to strike again. 

Peril at End House Review

Hercule Poirot is vacationing on the Cornish coast when he meets Nick Buckley. Nick is the young and reckless mistress of End House, an imposing structure perched on the rocky cliffs of St. Loo. Poirot has taken a particular interest in the young woman who has recently narrowly escaped a series of life-threatening accidents. Something tells the Belgian sleuth that these so-called accidents are more than just mere coincidences or a spate of bad luck. It seems all too clear to him that someone is trying to do away with poor Nick, but who? And, what is the motive? In his quest for answers, Poirot must delve into the dark history of End House. The deeper he gets into his investigation, the more certain he is that the killer will soon strike again. And, this time, Nick may not escape with her life.

Murder at the Playhouse Review

Late Summer, 1933. After a quarrel with too-plucky-for-her-own-good amateur sleuth Kitty Underhay, dashing ex-army captain Matthew Bryant is nursing his wounds, and a tumbler of brandy, when there’s a heavy knock at the door and he finds himself arrested for murder. The body of aspiring actress Pearl Bright has been found, strangled with one of Matt’s own bootlaces, and the evidence seems to be stacked against him. The local constabulary might have locked Matt up, but before they can throw away the key, Kitty hears the news and hies to his aid, determined to prove his innocence. And when her investigations lead her to the home of retired theatre impresario Stanley Davenport, and the local amateur dramatics society, Kitty uncovers a web of deceit that stretches far beyond the stage make-up.

The Mystery of the Blue Train Review

When the luxurious Blue Train arrives at Nice, a guard attempts to wake serene Ruth Kettering from her slumbers. But she will never wake again—for a heavy blow has killed her, disfiguring her features almost beyond recognition. What is more, her precious rubies are missing. The prime suspect is Ruth’s estranged husband, Derek. Yet Hercule Poirot is not convinced, so he stages an eerie reenactment of the journey, complete with the murderer on board. . . .

Closed Casket Review

Lady Athelinda Playford has planned a house party at her mansion in Clonakilty, Co Cork, but it is no ordinary gathering. As guests arrive, Lady Playford summons her lawyer to make an urgent change to her will – one she intends to announce at dinner that night. She has decided to cut off her two children without a penny and leave her fortune to someone who only has weeks to live, and she refuses to explain why…
Among Lady Playford’s guests are two men she has never met – the famous Belgian dectective, Hercule Poirot, and Inspector Edward Catchpool of Scotland Yard. Neither knows why he has been invited…until Poirot starts to wonder if Lady Playford expects a murderer to strike. But why does she seem so determined to provoke, in the the presence of a possible killer? And why, when the crime is committed in spite of Poirot’s best efforts to stop it, does the identity of the victim make no sense at all?

Rules for Perfect Murders Review

A series of unsolved murders with one thing in common: each of the deaths bears an eerie resemblance to the crimes depicted in classic mystery novels. The deaths lead FBI Agent Gwen Mulvey to mystery bookshop Old Devils. Owner Malcolm Kershaw had once posted online an article titled ‘My Eight Favourite Murders,’ and there seems to be a deadly link between the deaths and his list – which includes Agatha Christie’s The ABC Murders, Patricia Highsmith’s Strangers on a Train and Donna Tartt’s The Secret History. Can the killer be stopped before all eight of these perfect murders have been re-enacted?

I had mixed feelings about this book, click the title to read more.

August Wrap Up 2019

Here are all the books I read in August of 2019.

The Big Four by Agatha Christie (3 stars)

Bit of an average read this one. I felt little to no desire to keep reading and the ending left much to be desired. I did like, however, the James Bond feel to the plot and how it covered a couple of months and intertwined smaller cases. I was very happy to have finished it though.

Fullmetal Alchemist by Hiromu Arakawa (4 stars)

This was my first time reading manga and I thoroughly enjoyed it. I watched the TV show before picking up this book which made it an interesting reading experience. I loved seeing all the foreshadowing and dreaded reading certain volumes in which I know what happens. I loved the bromance in this book and the art is exceptional. A really fun read that I think everyone should give a go.

Sadie by Courtney Summers (4 stars)

A lot of firsts this month. This was my first ebook. My birthday is in August so I treated myself to a kindle. I decided to pick this up as it fit the theme for the ONTD reading challenge and I devoured it in one day! I loved the formatting in this book, flicking from podcast to Sadie’s first person POV. I really enjoyed the characters and the plot was heart-breaking.

The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde (3 stars)

This is a book I have been wanting to read for ages. I have always been intrigued by the premise of this novel and I was so excited to give it a go. It started off really strong and includes some of the best writing I have ever read but halfway through the pacing started to get the better of me and I started getting a bit bored. The ending is so good though!

The Two Towers by J.R.R Tolkien (2 stars)

Now this might shock some people but I DNFed the Two Towers. It started off really good. I loved the account of Merry and Pippin’s time and subsequent escape of the Orcs but the writing was just boring for me and the pacing was so slow. I started dreading it every time I would pick it up. So, I decided it was best to put it down.

The Big Four Review

“Framed in the doorway of Poirot’s bedroom stood an uninvited guest, coated from head to foot in dust. The man’s gaunt face stared for a moment, then he swayed and fell. Who was he? Was he suffering from shock or just exhaustion? Above all, what was the significance of the figure 4, scribbled over and over again on a sheet of paper? Poirot finds himself plunged into a world of international intrigue, risking his life to uncover the truth about ‘Number Four’.”

So this book was a funny one for me and I go into a bit more detail in the actual post but despite the book containing loads of things I love; cat and mouse chase, settings all over the world, political intrigue, numerous murders. This book just didn’t resonate with me as much as I had hoped hence the average rating.